Recommendation 1: Information Technology Resources (Physical Infrastructure)

The University of Maryland should build and maintain a sound, advanced, secure, and productive physical information technology infrastructure (including but not limited to facilities, hardware, networks, and software) capable of supporting broad and effective use by students, faculty, and staff throughout the institution, including remote university members such as agricultural extension offices.

Action Item 1.1 - Campus Data Centers

The university must immediately review and address the need for data center/cyberinfrastructure facilities that are appropriately sized, powered (including backup power), and cooled to meet the needs of university-wide demands for such facilities.

In today’s top tier research universities, the generation of new knowledge via the computing tools of simulation and visualization is greatly increasing (witness the design of new pharmaceuticals using computers), opening up new possibilities for those universities prepared to invest in the necessary large scale computing infrastructure. By many measures and in comparison with our national peers, Maryland does not have adequate and proper facilities for housing IT resources — in popular parlance, a data center. The lack of central data-housing facilities encourages the less-than-effective and cost inefficient development of distributed data center facilities in buildings across campus — in locations neither secured nor properly powered and cooled. This is a growing condition around campus, as decentralized efforts lead to scattered strategies in this regard. The lack of an appropriate facility hinders appropriate centralization of such resources and the opportunity to successfully leverage virtualized technologies (which would be more cost efficient); and this in turn increases the difficulty in the institution holistically evaluating and adopting successful cloud computing strategies (which may offer still greater cost efficiencies). The current primary data center facility also is not appropriately secured from a disaster or power outage — most of the institution’s key information and processing resources run without benefit of back-up generator coverage; and the primary data center is in a building that resides in a flood plain (and has, before, been flooded). This is perhaps the most fundamental and significant information technology issue facing UMD, with effects on the entire institution.

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Implementation Strategy

A university-wide IT infrastructure governance body will be developed that includes new or existing permanent representative bodies to oversee ongoing IT infrastructure resource management and university-wide best practices. The Division of IT will lead an effort to inventory and catalogue all IT data center facilities available to the university community and identify key elements such as "ownership," size, lifespan, IT capacity, IT load, power usage, reliability/risk, and security. Aggregate demand on current facilities will be assessed, and short-term, mid-term, and long-term demand will be projected. This information will go toward developing recommendations to the Vice President of IT for future planning related to UMD data center facilities and services.

Update March 2014

The Cyberinfrastructure Center became operational for colocation in January, 2014. It offers space for colocation of academic units' equipment and for housing the new Deepthought2 high-performance computing cluster, now being built. Please see www.it.umd.edu/cc for more information.

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Action Item 1.2 - Media Management

Address the university's needs for equipment, infrastructure, and appropriate spaces for enhanced digital content (video, audio, graphics, etc.), including but not limited to video streaming, video capture and editing, and storage.

Higher education is experiencing a revolution in the use of digital content and multimedia to assist with pedagogy as well as for other administrative and marketing uses. The current central streaming media platform managed by the Division of IT is cumbersome to use and maintain and consequently those that need this type of service are looking to third-party tools (e.g., YouTube, Vimeo, etc.) to service their needs. While mainstream tools are easy to access and learn, a platform with the same ease of use that also provides the ability to secure content to specific audiences and integrates with other learning systems on campus is preferable. Potential solutions may well include use of commercial cloud offerings, either arranged for the enterprise or for individual consumption.

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Implementation Strategy

A project team has been formed to gather the requirements for a system that would better enable the use, storage, and archiving of digital media assets. The project team will also be charged with identifying the use and practice framework for this campus service. It will be necessary to substantiate this service with the appropriate governance priority to proceed and funding source to procure the system and supporting structures.

Update March 2014

Requirements have been gathered and a statement of work drafted. Both have been sent to Procurement, and an RFP will be issued in early 2014.

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Action Item 1.3 - Digital Storage/File Sharing

Provide a variety of cost effective options (including secure campus cloud or outsourced cloud) for on-demand digital storage with daily backups centrally managed and broadly accessible. This shall also include the capability for robust file sharing among campus constituents and their off-campus collaborators. This should also be tiered, providing solutions that meet needs ranging from pervasive pedestrian applications through advanced "big data" research.

Digital file storage and sharing at an enterprise level is a critical element needed for university community members to be able to collaborate not only on campus, but with outside partners as well. There is currently a continuum of solutions for file storage and sharing that includes local network drives and easily accessible cloud-based tools. The limitations of both inhibit achieving the flexibility, throughput, and security needed to support all constituents' needs on campus. While publicly available cloud storage options are easily attained, security and policies must be put in place to ensure that sensitive data is protected. Public cloud storage solutions are not viable for research involving big data, nor are third-party apps efficient for managing files that never need to leave university systems. A combination of guidance for public storage use and more robust enterprise solutions will be developed to meet the demands of the university. Collaboration with higher education based service provider consortia, such as Internet2, may provide viable solutions in keeping with other strategic initiatives in this plan.

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Implementation Strategy

It will be necessary to assess the current environment to determine services that are presently offered at Maryland and which campus constituents have access to those services. Then, it will be necessary to identify gaps in service, outdated service approaches, and/or replicative services and adjust service offerings to meet the needs of the institution today and into the future.

Update March 2014

  • A multi-tier Network Attached Storage infrastructure was implemented, which offers 1 Petabyte of available storage across the Primary Data Center and Secondary Data Center.
  • Box.com was implemented during the Fall 2013 semester. The service currently provides 50 GB of cloud storage space for self-managed file sharing and collaboration for all UMD constituents. This service also allows for collaboration with people outside of the University of Maryland. Box organizational/group accounts, which can be administered and allocated by departments, were made available in January 2014.
  • A cloud storage management service for use in labs and selected classrooms is currently being tested. The service will allow users to access their cloud and local storage in a single interface, alleviating their need to carry files around to labs and classrooms.

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Action Item 1.4 - Unified Communications

Provide tools that allow the university community to collaborate through unified communication. While particularly critical for researchers, such tools will certainly have value to broader scholarly enablement and administrative effectiveness. Universal federated presence should be evaluated as part of such solutions and, depending upon community input, made available.

Increasing numbers of institutions are offering unified communication (UC) tools for enterprise use, allowing collaboration through online chat, desktop sharing, video conferencing, and group conference calling. Whether students working on a group project, a teacher holding virtual office hours, or researchers working together, collaboration among the university user community inside and out will be enhanced by the use of a common suite of UC tools, by allowing more efficient and diverse communication mechanisms. Universal federated presence is the ability for an individual to provide information about their online status from any platform/device to communicate that more broadly to their contacts.

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Implementation Strategy

As Unified Communications is composed of multiple solutions and is constantly evolving, resources will be adjusted accordingly over both the short and long term. The Division of IT will seek input from the campus community in order to develop the road map and identify how to best prioritize and provide the needed Unified Communications tools. This implementation will link directly with Action Item 1.10 (Federated Identity Management).

Update March 2014

  • The Division of IT analyzed the current communications infrastructure and is in the process of determining the effectiveness and useful lifespan of each system.
  • A survey was distributed and analyzed to determine priority and desire for new or enhanced Unified Communications tools.
  • A Request for Proposal (RFP) has been issued to determine the various Unified Communications systems that will be implemented for the campus environment, with specific emphasis on core components, such as the phone system.
  • The division has introduced new systems to the campus, including Adobe Connect for Web-based collaboration and UMD Conference Call Service for telephone conference-calling capabilities. Both are hosted by the division and are provided at no cost to faculty and staff.

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Action Item 1.5 - Network Refresh (1.5a) and MAX Refresh (1.5b)

A high-capacity, high-capability, advanced, and robust network infrastructure being crucial to the success of all IT enablement, the university will complete the ongoing Network Refresh Project. The Division of IT will continue to maintain the UMD network, balancing the ability to support the current IT landscape with stability and also to improve it as needed in support of the recommendations and action items put forth in this plan. Likewise, the Division of IT will continue its leadership role on behalf of the university in the Mid-Atlantic Crossroads (MAX), an innovative high-performance regional network, in support of research, education, and scientific discovery.

Since fall 2009, the university has been undergoing a planned five-year upgrade of its network infrastructure, which is creating the ability to have as large a conduit for digital throughput as any institution in the country. Currently, more than half of the buildings on campus have been completed, with many of those being the most complex with respect to the effort involved. Likewise, the core backbone for the entire network has been replaced, significantly speeding up network traffic across the entire campus. The Division of IT will analyze and revisit this investment in networking to ensure the appropriate mix of technology is being implemented based on university needs. When the project is complete, the Division of IT will ensure that continued enhancements are made to support the demands being placed on the network (especially in support of research) and that the university continues to be able to support the increased communications needs produced by implementation of this plan.

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Implementation Strategy

The Division of IT is scheduled to finish the initial phase of the Network Refresh in August 2014. The Network Refresh plan allows for a sustainable, robust network with funding, equipment life cycles, and campus participation through the Network Refresh Advisory Committee (NRAC). The division will continue to modernize current networks using input from the campus community including students, researchers, faculty, and staff.

The Mid-Atlantic Crossroads (MAX) regional high-performance network is also being enhanced and refreshed in support of the high-performance needs of the campus and regional research community. The MAX infrastructure and network serves as a platform for advanced cyber and networking service, research, and innovation. This expansive and powerful array of cyber infrastructure resources is available to campus researchers and their partners throughout the higher education research community.

Update March 2014

  • The Division of IT is still on schedule to finish the Network Refresh Project in August 2014. Efforts continue to upgrade the campus wireless network, data centers, and network core to support the latest technologies. Through the project, the division is now providing 1-Gbps connectivity to computer desktops in academic and administrative buildings, 100-Mbps connectivity to computer desktops in the dormitories, and 10-Gbps connectivity to the campus data centers and network core.
  • The division recently assumed responsibilities for the campus cable network and initiated the replacement of the legacy analog head end/distribution system to a newer digital system. The fiber optic footprint continues expanding, connecting several local off-campus departments to our telephone and data networks.
  • The division has initiated the Network Refresh of several buildings at the Shady Grove campus, as well as improved campus fiber redundancy and high bandwidth (10 Gbps) between the two campuses.
  • The Division of IT continues to work on the refresh and upgrade of the Mid-Atlantic Crossroads (MAX) regional network. The MAX upgrade includes multiple 100-Gbps connections to the wide area network Internet2, upgrade of all eleven MAX Points of Presence (PoPs) to support 100-Gbps participant connections, new PoPs in the life sciences research corridor in Shady Grove, MD, and direct connect to Amazon Web Services. This network upgrade is on track to be completed by the end of the first quarter 2014. As a result of this network refresh, the MAX regional network will be one of the most advanced regional networks in the country.

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Action Item 1.6 - Wi-Fi and Cellular Coverage

Wireless connectivity will continue to grow as a critical communications infrastructure. Wi-Fi and cellular coverage must continue to be expanded and made more robust, and providers must be diversified over time. In support of this growth, the Division of IT should immediately convene a group of students, faculty, and staff to get feedback on current issues, challenges, and successes of the existing wireless network.

With the propagation of wireless networking as part of the Network Refresh Project (see Action Item 1.5) the university's wireless networks have become very heavily relied upon as a means to communicate and share data. Whether in the classroom, in the office, or at a sporting event, the near ubiquity of handheld devices with the ability to connect to Wi-Fi and cellular networks (e.g,. phones, tablets, and laptops) have significantly increased the value proposition of wireless connectivity on campus. As the use of handheld devices grows, pockets of weak or no coverage as well as maximum capacity of the system in localized areas of extremely heavy use are being uncovered. The need for a fabric of wireless coverage that is pervasive over the entire campus and is able to balance the entire load being placed on it, even in areas of heavily concentrated use like large classrooms, is critical. The Division of IT will continue to assess patterns of use and engage its partners in providing wireless connectivity to enhance coverage so that the current and future demands of this growing digital environment are met. The Division of IT should also continue to evaluate and bring to the UMD wireless network enhancements such as eduroam (which was implemented in 2011) that facilitate broader global access to secured wireless networks.

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Implementation Strategy

The Division of IT will charge the existing Network Refresh Advisory Committee NRAC to discuss current designs and roadmaps to enhance current systems. Then it will develop a plan to get faculty, staff, and student feedback on current and future designs. The division will also continue to engage the various campus groups such as the Student Affairs IT directors, Academic Affairs IT directors, and the UTCC as well as aim to be more inclusive by seeking out thoughts, concerns, guidance, needs, and/or perspectives from other groups on campus regarding the wireless solutions currently supported and new solutions coming.

Due to current usage and future mobility projections obtained from internal research and external investigations involving various campus entities, the division’s intention is to deploy higher-capacity Wi-Fi solutions with contiguous coverage to ensure ubiquitous continuity throughout the campus. The division continues to research the latest technologies (e.g. 802.11ac) leaning towards early adoption, but remaining mindful of premature release woes.

The division is also coordinating and collaborating in partnership with cellular service providers to improve cellular coverage. It is working with cellular vendors to increase their macro tower capacity, as well as to develop a plan to distribute cellular signals in all buildings. The division has completed its first test case of the Distributed Antenna System (DAS) in the Van Munching Hall. In addition, the division is working closely with the athletics department to expedite its own DAS solution. Improving cellular coverage is a complex process, because the service provisioning belongs to cellular providers and hinges on partnerships with vendors outside of the university.

Update March 2014

  • Wi-Fi Coverage
    • Network Refresh continues to improve wireless coverage in campus buildings by adding resources and improving designs of existing implementations.
    • The Division of IT has deployed approximately 300 of the latest generation (802.11ac) access points in several buildings. The newer access points provide 1.3 Gbps compared to the existing at 450 Mbps.
    • The division has concluded an outdoor wireless survey and design. Pending approval from the Facilities Council, the division will deploy 200 mesh access points providing more comprehensive campus coverage outside of the buildings.
  • Cellular Coverage
    • The Division of IT has been working closely with our cellular vendors to improve coverage on campus.
      • Comcast Center – complete indoor coverage (Spring 2014).
      • Van Munching Hall – complete indoor coverage (Complete).
      • AT&T – new Macro Cell Sites (Spring 2014).
      • AT&T has surveyed more than 100 buildings and is in the process of design for an “Outdoor Distributive Antenna System.” This project will significantly improve cellular coverage throughout campus, installing hundreds of smaller antennas to distribute signal. (Winter 2014).

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Action Item 1.7 - Guidelines for Cloud Services/Cost Reduction through Partnerships

In recent years, the growth in network bandwidth has made it possible to take some computing burden (e.g., data storage and applications' use of CPU and memory) off of the desktop by allowing services and applications to be attained through centrally hosted means. The university must develop a strategy and approach to the deployment and support of cloud-based computing, including infrastructure and hosted third-party application solutions. The strategy must include: 1) Support of the use of such services independently by community members, providing well-documented guidance to ensure the continued security, integrity, and privacy of the university IT environment and 2) Centralized offerings (e.g., email, storage, digital media, etc.) obtained by the Division of IT on behalf of the campus and supported in such a way as to address conditions of service unique to individual units or groups as far as is practical to ensure effective and productive use of such offerings. The Division of IT and the university community should evaluate the hybridization of public/private cloud offerings across the spectrum of IT infrastructure and services and determine appropriate paths toward use of such offerings.

The trend toward use of cloud-based solutions within the last three to five years has created a challenging continuum of opportunity and risk. Opportunities arise in the form of inexpensive (often free) services, platforms, applications, and collaboration environments all made available and provisioned through simple point and click configuration with a long menu of options that can often be tailored to exact specifications. For IT operations, cloud computing provides an opportunity to strategically evaluate outsourcing functions that have traditionally been maintained and operated internally, to achieve cost savings, and to better utilize existing resources. The risks presented by cloud computing are based on the same aspects as the opportunities presented. Because of the ease in attaining cloud services (e.g., data storage, virtual computing environment hosting, email/communications applications, data archival, etc.), users are compelled to make use of these tools and services to forgo the "red tape" of dealing with central IT and possibly achieve cost savings. This is happening here at UMD at an increasing pace as services provided by the university are deemed less efficient and effective to use in comparison to the easily attainable cloud alternative. Risks are introduced, however, when no evaluation of licensing is performed and violation of laws and regulations governing IT at UMD, like HIPAA, FERPA, and export control laws, put sensitive research and personal data at risk of being compromised. As UMD grapples with the tradeoffs of opportunity versus risk and determines the right mix of creating private cloud computing resources and leveraging third-party offerings, presumably the cloud computing industry will mature as well. Together, these things should reduce the risks the university faces in using cloud services and make it easier for university community members to utilize this enabling technology.

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Implementation Strategy

Form a project group to develop a review process to verify SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS offerings prior to service procurement, facilitating proactive prevention of service and/or data issues for UMD. An outcome of this process will be a document that vendors will be required to complete pre-purchase to create understanding of service offerings, security and data ownership.

Update March 2014

A framework for purchasing SaaS/Cloud-based services has been shared with division staff members who have been engaged in rollout of remotely hosted services. This document will be the basis by which the project groups continue implementation of this action item.

In association with Action Item 6.8, the division is developing approaches for implementing hybrid cloud computing (combination of local and third party) for Web content.

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Action Item 1.8 - Anytime/Anywhere Remote Access

Recognizing that university community members need to access campus resources (files, applications, and services) from anywhere on the globe, safe and secure remote access solutions and access to virtualized applications should be provided.

Researchers, teaching faculty, administrators, students, and others continue to find the need to do the work of the university outside its walls -- whether pursuing opportunities for collaboration in China or India, performing cutting edge research at CERN, or simply working from home. Providing university community members access to university IT resources as though sitting in the office can improve efficiency by enabling personnel to perform certain duties from anywhere. This could include not only access to files and data from off campus, but also the ability to easily and safely access the applications and computing resources to work with that data remotely, without having to have a duplicate desktop environment built on a personal or mobile computing device.

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Implementation Strategy

This action item articulates well with Action Items 1.3 and 1.7, and it is part of a broader view of service offerings and how Web access to services is changing demands for availability, including remote access. These three action items taken together will form the basis to drive initiatives that will facilitate remote access in a safe and reliable manner.

Update March 2014

The University of Maryland is partnering with Adobe to implement the Creative Cloud for Enterprise. This will give UMD students, faculty, and staff remote access to Adobe products offered under the UMD enterprise contract.

The Division of IT has contracted with Box.com for a new cloud-based service for UMD students, faculty, and staff. The new service provides access to cloud storage that allows the user to set file share permissions, offers collaboration among users, and provides 50 GB of cloud-based file storage that can be accessed by any device, anywhere, at any time.

TERPware is another new service that was implemented to provide faculty, staff, and students with anytime, anywhere download access to software procured for the university.

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Action Item 1.9 - Broad Software Licensing

Provide needed software tools in the most effective ways possible to faculty, staff, and students. This could be achieved by developing efficient means to license software broadly for the entire university community, or through cooperative efforts of relevant units and central IT, or via virtualized desktop infrastructure (VDI). It will likely be the case that a combination of all these means will provide the best solution, and the Division of IT should lead the university in a thorough evaluation resulting in appropriate specific actions.

While the university has been successfully engaged in bulk PC buying for a number of years, there is a potential for additional savings related to economies of scale in the purchase of software licenses. Some broad software licenses exist but are not available to all university constituencies, while other software is purchased separately in smaller quantities by multiple departments. The Division of IT will begin to better track and analyze what software is being purchased in what quantity and work with units to consolidate purchasing to achieve cost and resource savings. Efficiencies will be gained in terms of aligning partners with similar software needs who might not otherwise seek to find partners with whom to piggyback their purchases. The use of VDI certainly holds great promise, but it is likely not a singular solution to be pursued. That said, efforts to evaluate and appropriately make use of this technology must rapidly advance.

The Division of IT should work with the UMD community to coordinate the purchase and licensing -- and potentially tracking and delivery -- of software to identify opportunities for better volume/pricing/campus-wide agreements that may be available. Exotic singular use, discipline-specific software would not be part of this process unless its use has broader applications across disciplines. It shall not be assumed that centralized funding of such packages will be possible, though centralized coordination of different funding sources may have value.

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Implementation Strategy

The Division of IT will consult with UMD IT procurement staff to develop a program to evaluate software for broad-use or enterprise licensing and work collaboratively to execute contracts for obtaining software. The Division of IT will develop approaches for obtaining funding sources to facilitate this licensing. A comprehensive strategy for virtualization environments will be developed and will factor into the purchase, negotiation, and delivery process to make most effective use of delivery.

Update March 2014

Several licensing agreements have been established, including agreements with Adobe and Microsoft. TERPware provides free, online access to these product suites, along with approximately 44 other titles.

Additional opportunities are being considered through cooperative purchase agreements through NET+ and the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC).

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Action Item 1.10 - Integrated Identity Management System

Recognizing that many action items in this plan rely on the ability to verify a person's credentials (login/password identity) before access can be granted to university systems, an efficient process and system for identity management must be constantly enhanced and maintained to accommodate the nuances in roles of individuals within the university and for integration with new system implementations. A unified/federated university-wide identity management framework, which allows quick and efficient moves/adds/changes within the university as well as the ability to grant limited secure access to partners outside UMD, is the foundation of security and collaboration.

Nearly every UMD-centric system/application requires authentication (login/password) before any access is granted. When university systems are implemented, consideration must be given as to how to protect access to only those who are properly vetted. Currently, there is at minimum a day-long wait period before the database of user credentials is updated with new hires, and often this is elongated to several days. For outside collaborators (consultants, research partners, etc.), an affiliate status must be granted, currently requiring a lengthy approval process. To accommodate more centralization of enterprise services such as this on campus, as well as external collaborative efforts like the new MPower initiative, and without compromising security, a more streamlined process for adding staff and outside collaborators is desired. Likewise, the identity management architecture should hold one system as authoritative despite appointments, affiliation status, or other such relationships with the university. Currently, the identity management architecture is retrofitted and updated as an afterthought to accommodate new systems and/or changes in relationship status with the university. A clear design, implementation plan, and standard set of procedures for identity management should be documented with changes controlled as stringently as other critical university systems. It is also the case at this time that there are many competing issuers of identity at UMD, and while this diversity provides local flexibility, it constrains global efforts to facilitate external collaboration. To take advantage of global IdM collaborative efforts such as InCommon, UMD must have a unified identity architecture without stifling the ability to localize identity management where it is essential for technical innovation in research.

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Implementation Strategy

The university community, as noted in the strategic plan, has expressed the need for more timely and consistent access to applications and resources within the University of Maryland, College Park system. Current provisioning of identity goes through a lengthy process that requires entry into multiple systems of record, batch processing, and then downstream deployment of information to multiple locations for synchronizing and deployment.

In direct collaboration with campus partners (e.g., data stewards, system owners, HR, etc.), projects resulting from this action item will result in an integrated identity management system that will interface with existing and future systems to provide rapid deployment of data to appropriate systems and manage the roles and groupings needs of the university. Work on this system will begin with a requirements gathering, design, and implementation phase. The system will need to be standards based and abstract enough to be anticipate the future needs of the university. The university already follows InCommon standards and will extend that model for future collaborations with other universities. An inventory of authentication methods used across the university will be created to look for opportunities for consolidation and migration to central authentication systems. Use cases for partnerships with outside collaborators will also be developed in order to meet both on-campus and off-campus collaboration needs in a secure and efficient environment.

Update March 2014

A needs analysis is currently under way.

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Action Item 1.11 - IT Sustainability

In support of the university's goals for sustainability, the Division of IT, the Office of Sustainability, and local IT units will work together to pursue measures that promote more effective power management and lower operational energy use overall.

Through such technology as server virtualization, the university has already drastically reduced the number of physical servers running at any given time. A concerted effort will be made to further lower the carbon footprint of technology on campus through better desktop and printer power management and practices. The IT community will work with the Office of Sustainability and the university community to reduce power consumption without adversely impacting productivity.

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Implementation Strategy

Identify opportunities to improve IT power management efficiency through best practices applied university-wide, including, but not limited to, data center facility management, server virtualization, consolidated use of high-performance computing for research purposes, storage management, and client device management. In conjunction with Action Item 1.1, an assessment will be made of the Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) of every data center facility on campus. Recommendations will be developed for best practices to improve PUE when possible, as well as consolidating facilities where appropriate. Continue partnership with the Office of Facilities Management and the Center for Advanced Life Cycle Engineering in collecting energy usage data and results of configuration changes. In conjunction with Action Item 1.7 (cloud computing), identify IT functions to be moved to the cloud (on-or off-campus) resulting in a lower energy usage on campus. Continue to participate with the university Sustainability Committee in its goals.

Update March 2014

Working with Facilities Management and Mechanical Engineering/Center for Advanced Lifecycle Engineering, an energy audit was performed in the Primary Data Center (PDC) resulting in efficiency recommendations creating real energy and financial savings for the university. The first recommendation, to shut down two cooling units in the PDC, has been implemented, resulting in an expected energy savings of over $10,000 annually. An incremental increase of the return air set points on the PDC cooling units is under way that is expected to save an additional $10,000 to $15,000 annually. Now in the second year of the data center energy audit project, the model developed during the PDC audit is being applied in an audit of the Secondary and Research Data Centers. We anticipate recommendations for these data centers that will further university sustainability goals. This data center energy audit model, developed and tested in Division of IT data centers could then be applied in other IT facilities across campus.

The project to make the Cyberinfrastructure Center operational is under way and near completion. This facility will help consolidate a currently distributed research IT hardware energy load. Currently much research IT hardware is housed in makeshift facilities within academic and administrative buildings not designed to efficiently house IT hardware. By centralizing research computing on Deepthought2 and/or in the colocation facility while shutting down the inefficient spaces, the overall efficiency of the campus IT facility footprint should improve.

We are also looking into power management tools for desktops and managed labs.

There is an ongoing initiative to increase the percentage of servers that are virtualized across the Solaris and Linux environments. The increased use of virtual machines means less hardware actually consuming energy.

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